Resurrection: Accepting the Consequences of God’s Greatest Act of Peacemaking

Resurrection: Accepting the Consequences of God’s Greatest Act of Peacemaking By David Edling, Senior Ministry Consultant (retired) for Peacemaker Ministries If you are familiar with Peacemaker Ministries’ materials, you know that “accept the consequences” is one of the Seven A’s of Confession. When we confess our sin completely, we show that our confession is sincere by taking responsibility for the harm we have caused. In other words, we willingly “accept the consequences.” Similarly, when we confess Christ as our Lord and Savior, we show that our profession of faith is sincere by accepting the consequences. But what does that really mean? As Easter approaches, I have been thinking about how accepting God’s gift of eternal life in Christ also means accepting the “consequence” that it was my sin that made Christ’s death on the cross necessary. Realizing this was, for me, the first step in recognizing my need for a Savior who could completely and effectively take responsibility for my sin and its harmful effects. The sacrifice for my sin could not be borne by me, but only by the One who knew no sin. Therefore, only Jesus Christ, the spotless Lamb, could be offered as an acceptable sacrifice, reconciling me with God the Father (see Revelation 5). This is the gospel—the good news that the consequences of my sins are paid for and forgiven in Christ, because he alone is worthy. All who have stopped trusting in their own worthless sacrifice and have placed their trust in Christ for eternal life know this to be true. But how often do we stop to think about the other consequence, the present consequence of...

Perry Church Of The Nazarene

A Snapshot of a Church on the Journey Perry Church of the Nazarene in Perry, MI Jon Demerly, a lay leader for Perry Church of the Nazarene, answers a few questions about his church’s experience on its journey toward a culture of peace. What got your church started with peacemaking? Our church experienced a conflict amongst the leadership that did not go well. This situation was combined with a vague feeling that unresolved conflicts of the past were still lingering. Out of all this, I was personally struck with a sense that God must have a better way. As one of the church leaders, I felt inadequate to deal with these situations on my own, and so I figured that there must be others out there that have been down this road already. I literally did a Google search on “church conflict” and was amazed by what I found. I was initially struck by the sheer amount of information out there, confirming for me that we were not alone in having conflict. After checking several websites, I came to the Peacemaker Ministries website, and it was very clear to me that God did have a better way. Here was a place that definitely had a right heart about how to approach conflict. I spent a fair amount of time going through the material on the website. With a new sense of hope, I shared this information with our senior pastor, Tim Harmon, who also embraced it. This was the beginning of the process for us. What steps has your church taken to implement peacemaking? Do you have a peacemaking...

Family/Marriage/Children

 Articles on Family/Marriage/Children   Resurrection: Accepting the Consequences of God’s Greatest Act of Peacemaking Family/Marriage/Children Why Christians Divorce Walking in Peace amid Holiday Strife The Myths of Divorce The High Cost of Conflict Among Christians The God We Can Trust The Effects of Divorce on America The Dangers of “Good” Advocacy The Cross and Criticism « Older Entries DVD Group Study Find Help Upcoming Events...

Why Christians Divorce

Why Christians DivorceWithout a doubt, the divorce rate today for Christians is alarmingly high. While there are many factors that contribute to this trend, Chuck Colson addresses one in particular in this short essay: the propensity to appeal to feelings as the highest authority. Chuck rightly describes this as a form of serving false gods—it is idolatry in its very essence. Viewing feelings as the authority only confuses and entraps those involved, distorting the truth and authority of Scripture as well as God’s true design for marriage. Therefore, I commend this article to you as another tool to use in gently helping others to truthfully face their struggles in marriage without turning to divorce.—Ken Sande Peacemaking Women With personal stories and advice firmly rooted in Scripture, this book offers hope for peace with God, peaceful relationships with others, and genuine peace within. $13.95 more info I still remember my sadness on hearing that an old friend and someone I believed was a sincere Christian, was leaving his wife of many years. I was shocked and disappointed. I wondered: How could this man, committed to both his spouse and his Lord, fall in love with another woman?An essay by the late Sheldon Vanauken helps answer the question and reminds us that such temptations are all too common. Vanauken, best known as the author of the powerful love story titled A Severe Mercy, also published a collection of essays called Under the Mercy, which explores these feelings. In one essay called “The Loves,” Vanauken describes how a Christian friend named John shocked him by announcing that he was leaving his wife to marry...

What Is Truth? The Fight Against Practical Relativism

What Is Truth? The Fight Against Practical Relativismby David V. Edling and Molly Routson The Challenge to Truth-Thinking Resolving Everyday Conflict Small group Bible study that’s perfect for use in the church or workplace. Ideal for Sunday school classes, membership classes, mission teams, or neighborhood Bible studies—any group that wants to learn, discuss, and apply the principles of biblical peacemaking together. Church Price: $199.00 more info “There is one thing a professor can be absolutely certain of: almost every student entering the university believes, or says he believes, that truth is relative.”1 Professor Allan Bloom began his 1987 bestseller, The Closing of the American Mind, with these words; and over the following decade relativism became so ingrained in the so-called “closed American mind” that it warranted its own epoch-defining cultural label: postmodernism. Postmodernism is our society’s term for the majority’s firmly held belief that truth is not knowable and, therefore, cannot be absolute. Speaking of students entering the university, Bloom went on to state that, “the relativity of truth is not a theoretical insight but a moral postulate, the condition of a free society, or so they see it.” Bloom didn’t use the terms “postmodern,” “postmodernity” or “postmodernism,” but he clearly saw its effects in the belief systems and lives of his students.Seven years after Bloom penned his work, Lutheran professor, theologian, and cultural observer Gene Edward Veith stated in his book Postmodern Times, “It is hard to witness to truth to people who believe truth is relative. It is hard to proclaim the forgiveness of sins to people who believe that, since morality is relative, they have no...