Resurrection: Accepting the Consequences of God’s Greatest Act of Peacemaking

Resurrection: Accepting the Consequences of God’s Greatest Act of Peacemaking By David Edling, Senior Ministry Consultant (retired) for Peacemaker Ministries If you are familiar with Peacemaker Ministries’ materials, you know that “accept the consequences” is one of the Seven A’s of Confession. When we confess our sin completely, we show that our confession is sincere by taking responsibility for the harm we have caused. In other words, we willingly “accept the consequences.” Similarly, when we confess Christ as our Lord and Savior, we show that our profession of faith is sincere by accepting the consequences. But what does that really mean? As Easter approaches, I have been thinking about how accepting God’s gift of eternal life in Christ also means accepting the “consequence” that it was my sin that made Christ’s death on the cross necessary. Realizing this was, for me, the first step in recognizing my need for a Savior who could completely and effectively take responsibility for my sin and its harmful effects. The sacrifice for my sin could not be borne by me, but only by the One who knew no sin. Therefore, only Jesus Christ, the spotless Lamb, could be offered as an acceptable sacrifice, reconciling me with God the Father (see Revelation 5). This is the gospel—the good news that the consequences of my sins are paid for and forgiven in Christ, because he alone is worthy. All who have stopped trusting in their own worthless sacrifice and have placed their trust in Christ for eternal life know this to be true. But how often do we stop to think about the other consequence, the present consequence of...

Perry Church Of The Nazarene

A Snapshot of a Church on the Journey Perry Church of the Nazarene in Perry, MI Jon Demerly, a lay leader for Perry Church of the Nazarene, answers a few questions about his church’s experience on its journey toward a culture of peace. What got your church started with peacemaking? Our church experienced a conflict amongst the leadership that did not go well. This situation was combined with a vague feeling that unresolved conflicts of the past were still lingering. Out of all this, I was personally struck with a sense that God must have a better way. As one of the church leaders, I felt inadequate to deal with these situations on my own, and so I figured that there must be others out there that have been down this road already. I literally did a Google search on “church conflict” and was amazed by what I found. I was initially struck by the sheer amount of information out there, confirming for me that we were not alone in having conflict. After checking several websites, I came to the Peacemaker Ministries website, and it was very clear to me that God did have a better way. Here was a place that definitely had a right heart about how to approach conflict. I spent a fair amount of time going through the material on the website. With a new sense of hope, I shared this information with our senior pastor, Tim Harmon, who also embraced it. This was the beginning of the process for us. What steps has your church taken to implement peacemaking? Do you have a peacemaking...

Family/Marriage/Children

 Articles on Family/Marriage/Children   Resurrection: Accepting the Consequences of God’s Greatest Act of Peacemaking Family/Marriage/Children Why Christians Divorce Walking in Peace amid Holiday Strife The Myths of Divorce The High Cost of Conflict Among Christians The God We Can Trust The Effects of Divorce on America The Dangers of “Good” Advocacy The Cross and Criticism « Older Entries DVD Group Study Find Help Upcoming Events...

The Myths of Divorce

The Myths of Divorceby Ken Sande, Founder of Peacemaker Ministries Peacemaking Women With personal stories and advice firmly rooted in Scripture, this book offers hope for peace with God, peaceful relationships with others, and genuine peace within. $13.95 more info Most of us would not consider ourselves to be gullible or naïve, yet Scripture often reminds us, “Do not be deceived.” (e.g., James 1:16, Gal. 6:7). In truth, we are easily deceived, and we so often latch on to a piece of “worldly wisdom” that sounds good to us and justifies our actions, even if it is not at all based on the truth of God’s word. Our very hearts fool us and hinder us from seeing situations clearly or accurately. Jeremiah 17:9 says, “The heart is deceitful above all things and beyond cure. Who can understand it?”In the same way, I have noticed over the years that Christians who are in the process of seeking a divorce often use same set of reasons to justify their decision to leave the marriage. I have heard the same excuses so often that I have wondered whether Satan has published a little booklet on how to justify a divorce. The excuses comprise what may be called a “popular divorce mythology.”1 While Christians disagree about what constitutes legitimate grounds for divorce, it is clear that many Christians divorce for all the wrong reasons. We need people around us to speak truth to us and help us see our own blind spots so that we are not fooled by worldly wisdom or by the blindness in our own hearts. Perhaps you can play...

The Measure of a Place

The Measure of a Place  by Chip Zimmer, Director of International MinistriesI was 21 years old and a recent college graduate when I traveled outside North America for the first time.  In August 1970 I flew to Nepal, where I would spend two years as a Peace Corps volunteer. My introduction to Nepalese culture had begun two months earlier during training in Davis, California, but it wasn’t until we were on our final approach into Tribhuvan Airport that I appreciated how different Nepal was from anything I’d experienced before.  There, outside my window and a few hundred feet below, stood Bodnath, one of the most famous Buddhist shrines in the Kathmandu valley.  I couldn’t take my eyes off the domed temple, with its superstructure of painted eyes, prayer flags, and golden crown.  This definitely was not Kansas. I’ve often found that my most intense memories of a place are linked to sights, sounds, or smells.  As vivid as these are, however, such physical stimuli can be misleading.  They may tell me that a place is different, but it is not until I have been granted access into the lives of people who live there that I form an appreciation for a culture’s fundamental shape, and for how its values align with or are at odds with my own or with God’s. My friend Ted Kober discovered this on his first visit to India several years ago.  Ted had been invited by church leaders to teach peacemaking in the southern part of the country.  After one of the presentations, a pastor raised his hand to ask a question that went...